A trip down memory lane!

October 31, 2020


The other day, Meg (aka Millie) brought it to my attention that the old TCM Message Board archives are still accessible online! So I did a quick google search for my old username and I actually found my profile, along with my entry in the 5th TCM Programming Challenge back in 2007! 

I was only active on the boards from 2006-2007, but it was my first introduction to the online world of classic film fans. Up until that point my parents were the only other people I knew who liked classic movies, and everyone else I knew made fun of me for it. Obviously starting this blog and meeting a bunch of young classic film fans in 2009 was life changing, but I still think of the message boards as my first experience with kindred spirits.

Anyway, I thought for the sake of posterity I'd preserve my 2007 TCM schedule here on my blog. For anyone unfamiliar with the message boards, this was an unofficial challenge where you had to create one full week of TCM programming. You had to include running times, studios, air times, and some shorts that would play in between movies. It was fun and time consuming and I only did it once. I think everyone who ever partook in this challenge walked away with a newfound respect for the people who program 365 days of movies every year!

I worked SO hard on this at the time. I took it so seriously and kept fiddling with it and making sure all of the times worked out perfectly and I had managed to include everything that I felt deserved a spotlight. My one prescient inclusion was a brand new weekly feature called "Nighttime Noir" on Saturday nights, a full 10 years before the channel launched Noir Alley! I think that's pretty cool! :D

Okay, so without further ado, here is my schedule, meant to air the week of Sunday July 22- Saturday July 28, 2007-

Sunday July 22 

SCREWBALL SUNDAY (New Weekly Feature) 
6:00AM: Merrily We Live (1938) Constance Bennett, Brian Aherne 90 mins MGM 

On the Loose (Live Action Short) 
8:00AM: The Last Hurrah (1958) Spencer Tracy, Pat O'Brien 120 mins Columbia 

GROWING OLD 
10:00AM: On Borrowed Time (1939) Lionel Barrymore, Beulah Bondi 93 mins MGM 
11:45AM: Mr. Skeffington (1944) Bette Davis, Claude Rains 146 mins WB 
3:15PM: Someone to Remember (TCM Premiere) (1943) 79 mins Republic Pictures 
Rapunzel (Animated Short) 
4:45PM: The Captain is a Lady (1940) Charles Coburn, Beulah Bondi 63 mins MGM 

A Day in Venice (Travelogue) 

ESSENTIALS
6PM: Now, Voyager (1942) Bette Davis, Paul Henreid 117 mins, WB 

BEHIND THE SCENES (HOLLYWOOD FILMS) 
8:00PM: Boy Meets Girl (1938) James Cagney, Pat O'Brien 86 mins WB 
9:30PM: Going Hollywood (1933) Dick Powell, Rosemary Lane 75 mins, MGM 
10:45PM: It Happened in Hollywood (1937) Richard Dix, Fay Wray 67 mins Columbia 

SILENT SUNDAY (Hollywood theme continues) 
12:00AM: The Matinee Idol (1928) Richard Dix, Fay Wray 66 mins Columbia 
1:15AM: His New Job (1915) Charlie Chaplin, Ben Turpin 30 mins Essanay 

TCM IMPORTS
1:45AM: Forbidden Games (1952) Brigitte Fossey, Georges Poujouly 102 mins Silver Films 
3:30AM: Rhapsody in Blue (1945) Robert Alda, Joan Leslie 139 mins WB

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Monday July 23 

HAL ROACH MINI-MARATHON
Thelma & Patsy 
6:00AM: The Tin Man (1935) Thelma Todd, Patsy Kelly 20 mins MGM 
6:20AM: Air Fright (1933) Thelma Todd, Patsy Kelly 20 mins MGM 
6:40AM: Done in Oil (1934) Thelma Todd, Patsy Kelly 20 mins MGM 

Thelma & Zasu 
7:00AM: Maids a'la Mode (1933) Thelma Todd, ZaSu Pitts 20 mins MGM 
7:20AM: Asleep in the Feet (1933) Thelma Todd, ZaSu Pitts 20 mins MGM 
7:40AM: Red Noses (1932) Thelma Todd, ZaSu Pitts 20 mins MGM 

8:00AM: To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) Gregory Peck, Mary Badham 129 mins p/s 

THE BUTLER DID IT (Salute to Eric Blore and Halliwell Hobbes)
10:15AM: It's Love I'm After (1937) Leslie Howard, ERIC BLORE 87 mins WB 
11:45AM: The War Against Mrs. Hadley (1942) Fay Bainter, HALLIWELL HOBBES 86 mins MGM 
1:15PM: Piccadilly Jim (1936) Robert Montgomery, ERIC BLORE 90 mins MGM 
2:45PM: Lady for a Day (1933) Warren William, HALLIWELL HOBBES 88 mins Columbia 
The Changing of the Guard (Live-Action short) 

ARTHUR TREACHER BIRTHDAY SALUTE 
4:45PM: Thank You, Jeeves! (TCM Premiere) (1936) Arthur Treacher, David Niven 57 mins FOX 
5:45PM: Personal Maid (1935) Ruth Donnelly, Arthur Treacher 60 mins WB 
7:00PM: Bridal Suite (1939) Annabella, Robert Young, Arthur Treacher 70 mins MGM 

LOVE AND LARCENY
8:00PM: How to Steal a Million (TCM Premiere) (1966) Audrey Hepburn, Peter O'Toole 127 mins FOX 
10:15PM: The Law and the Lady (1951) Greer Garson, Michael Wilding 104 mins MGM 
11:45PM: The Mystery of Mr. X (1934) Robert Montgomery, Elizabeth Allen 91 mins MGM 
1:15AM: The Last of Mrs. Cheney (1929) Norma Shearer, Basil Rathbone 94 mins MGM 

2:45AM: Some Came Running (1959) Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin 134 mins MGM 
5:00AM: Private Screenings: Shirley MacLaine (2003) 60 mins

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Tuesday July 24 

FEMALE FLYERS (Amelia Earhart's Birthday)
6:00AM: Christopher Strong (1933) Katherine Hepburn, Colin Clive 72 mins RKO 
7:15AM: Isle of Destiny (1940) William Gargan, Wallace Ford 95 mins RKO 
Little Johnny Jet (Animated Short)
9:00AM: Roaming Lady (1936) Fay Wray, Ralph Bellamy 69 mins Columbia 

10:15AM: Together Again (1944) Irene Dunne, Charles Boyer 93 mins Columbia 
12:00PM: Letty Lynton (1932) Joan Crawford, Robert Montgomery 84 mins MGM 

ROAD TRIPS 
1:00PM: Fugitive Lovers (1934) Robert Montgomery, Madge Evans 74 mins MGM
2:30PM: It Happened One Night (1934) Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert 105 mins Columbia 
4:15PM: Two for the Road (1967) Audrey Hepburn, Albert Finney 112 mins FOX p/s 
6:15PM: The Long, Long Trailer (1954) Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz 95 mins MGM 
Sniffles Takes a Trip (Animated Short) 

BARBARA STANWYCK (STAR OF THE MONTH- 100TH BIRTHDAY TRIBUTE):
Stany Rarities 
8:00PM: This Is My Affair (TCM Premiere)(1937) Barbara Stanwyck, Robert Taylor 99 mins FOX 
The Film Fan (Animated Short)
9:45PM: You Belong to Me (1941) Barbara Stanwyck, David Niven 94 mins Columbia 
Jennifer Jason Leigh on Barbara Stanwyck 
A Wild Hare (Animated Short) 
11:30PM: Ever in My Heart (1933) Barbara Stanwyck, Otto Kruger 70 mins WB 
12:45AM: Shopworn (1932) Barbara Stanwyck, Regis Toomey 78 mins Columbia 
2:15AM: His Brother's Wife (1936) Barbara Stanwyck, Robert Taylor 90 mins MGM 
3:45AM: Secret Bride (1934) Barbara Stanwyck, Warren William 65 mins WB 
5:00AM: A Lost Lady (1934) Barbara Stanwyck, Frank Morgan 60 mins WB

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Wednesday July 25th 

HEAD'S UP: Psychological movies 
6:00AM: A Double Life (1948) Ronald Colman, Signe Hasso 104 mins Universal p/s 
7:45AM: Rage in Heaven (1941) Robert Montgomery, Ingrid Bergman 85 mins MGM 
9:15AM: High Wall (1948) Robert Taylor, Audrey Totter 99 mins MGM 
11:00AM: Possessed (1947) Joan Crawford, Van Heflin 108 mins WB 
1:00PM: My Name is Julia Ross (1945) Nina Foch, Dame May Whitty 65 mins Columbia 
2:15PM: The Locket (1946) Laraine Day, Brian Aherne 86 mins RKO 

Believe it or else (Animated Short) 
4:00PM: Citizen Kane (1941) Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten 119 mins RKO 
6:00PM: My Darling Clementine (TCM Premiere)(1946) Henry Fonda, Walter Brennan 97 mins FOX 
The Live Ghost (Live Action Short) 

MEAL TIME 
8:00PM: Dinner at Eight (1934) Billie Burke, Jean Harlow 110 mins MGM 
10:00PM: Guess Who's Coming to Dinner? (1967) Katherine Hepburn, Spencer Tracy 108 mins Columbia  
The Midnight Snack (Animated Short) 
12:00AM: The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942) Monty Wooley, Bette Davis 118 mins WB 
The Wabbit Who Came to Supper (Animated Short) 
2:00AM: Love Before Breakfast (1936) Carole Lombard, Preston Foster 70 mins Universal p/s 
3:15AM: He Stayed for Breakfast (1940) Loretta Young, Melvyn Douglas 86 mins Columbia 
4:45AM: Married Before Breakfast (1937) Robert Young, Florence Rice 70 mins MGM

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Thursday July 26

MEAL TIME, Con't 
6:00AM: Kisses for Breakfast (1941) Dennis Morgan, Jane Wyatt 81 mins WB 
How to Eat (Live Action Short) 
7:30AM: Breakfast for Two (1937) Barbara Stanwyck, Herbert Marshall 67 mins RKO 
An Hour for Lunch (Live Action Short) 
8:45AM: Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961) Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard 114 mins Paramount p/s 

10:45AM: The Clouded Yellow (1950) Trevor Howard, Jean Simmons 96 mins Rank 
12:15PM: Carefree (1938) Ginger Rogers, Fred Astaire 80 mins RKO 

SALUTE TO ROBERT RISKIN 
1:45PM: Magic Town (1947) Jimmy Stewart, Jane Wyman 103 mins RKO 
3:30PM: The Whole Town's Talking (1935) Edward G. Robinson, Jean Arthur 95 mins Columbia 
5:15PM: The Cowboy and the Lady (1938) Gary Cooper, Merle Oberon 90 mins United Artists p/s 
6:45PM: American Madness (1932) Walter Huston, Pat O'Brien 75 mins Columbia Thursday Primetime 

MILLS NIGHT 
8:00PM: Tiger Bay (1959) John Mills, Hayley Mills 105 mins Disney Live Action 
9:45PM: So Well Remembered (1947) John Mills, Trevor Howard 114 mins RKO 
11:45PM: That Darn Cat (1965) Hayley Mills 116 mins Disney Live Action 
1:45AM: The History of Mr. Polly (1949) John Mills 94 mins Rank 
3:30AM: Pollyanna (1960) Hayley Mills, Jane Wyman 133 mins Disney Live Action 
King Midas (Animated Short) 

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Friday July 27 

MEET ME AT THE CASBAH 
6:00AM: Casablanca (1943) Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman 99 mins WB 
7:45AM: Kismet (1944) Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich 103 mins MGM 
9:30AM: Algiers (1938) Charles Boyer, Hedy Lamarr 96 mins United Artists p/s 

11:15AM: Gaslight (1944) Charles Boyer, Ingrid Bergman 111 mins MGM 
1:15PM: Love Affair (1939) Charles Boyer, Irene Dunne 89 mins RKO 

AN "AYE" FOR AN "AYE" (Films about Scotland) 
2:45PM: Crest of the Wave (1954) Gene Kelly, John Justin 90 mins MGM 
4:15PM: The Green Years (1946) Charles Coburn, Hume Cronyn 127 mins MGM 
6:30PM: Bonnie Scotland (1935) Stan Laurel, Oliver Hardy 82 mins MGM 
A Wee Bit of Scotland (Travelogue) 

BOX SET: JOAN BLONDELL 
8:00PM: Miss Pacific Fleet (1935) Joan Blondell, Glenda Farrell 66 mins WB 
9:15PM: Three Men on a Horse (1936) Joan Blondell, Frank McHugh 88 mins WB 
10:45PM:The Perfect Specimen (1937) Joan Blondell, Errol Flynn 88 mins WB 

 (Box set also features Off the Record (1939) JB & Pat O'Brien WB and Back in Circulation (1937) JB & Pat O'Brien WB)

12:15AM: There's Always a Woman (1938) Joan Blondell, Melvyn Douglas 82 mins Columbia 

TCM UNDERGROUND
2:00AM: The Blob (1958) Steve McQueen, Aneta Corseaut 86 mins Paramount p/s 
3:45AM: The Unholy Three (1930) Lon Chaney, Lila Lee 86 mins MGM 

5:15AM: The Pilgrim (1923) Charlie Chaplin, Edna Purviance 39 mins United Artists p/s

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Saturday July 28

6:00AM: To Be or Not to Be (1942) Carole Lombard, Jack Benny 100 mins United Artists p/s 
7:45AM: Fifth Avenue Girl (1939) Ginger Rogers, Walter Connolly 83 mins RKO 
9:30AM: Mark of the Vampire (1935) Lionel Barrymore, Elizabeth Allen 60 mins MGM 

WOLVES, FALCONS AND SAINTS, OH MY! (New Weekly Feature) 
10:30AM: The Lone Wolf Strikes (1940) Warren William, Eric Blore 57 mins Columbia 

CARTOON ALLEY - Cartoon Crooners
11:30AM: Catch as Cats Can 
11:37AM: Crosby, Colombo, and Vallee 
11:44AM: I Only Have Eyes For You 
11:50AM: Bingo Crosbyana 

12:00PM: Inherit the Wind (1960) Spencer Tracy, Fredric March 127 mins United Artists p/s 

BERGMAN/HITCHCOCK  
2:15PM: Notorious (1946) Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant 103 mins RKO 
4:00PM: Under Capricorn (1949) Ingrid Bergman, Joseph Cotten 117 mins WB 

NIGHTTIME NOIR (New Weekly Feature) 
6:00PM: The Blue Dahlia (1946) Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake 100 mins Paramount p/s 

THE ESSENTIALS 
8:00PM: The Palm Beach Story (1942) Claudette Colbert, Joel McCrea, Rudy Vallee 90 mins Paramount p/s 

RUDY VALLEE BIRTHDAY TRIBUTE  
9:30PM: Sweet Music (1935) Rudy Vallee 90 mins WB 
11:00PM: Gold Diggers in Paris (1938) Rudy Vallee 100 mins WB
12:45AM: Variety Time (1948) Jack Parr 59 mins RKO 
1:45AM: Captain Sinbad (1963) Guy Williams, Heidi Bruhl 85 mins MGM 
3:15AM: Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) Charles Laughton, Clark Gable 130 mins MGM 

Fast Work (Live Action Short)

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Some notes I had written to explain my choices:

"Someone to Remember" is a film in which an old lady in a rest home finds out they are replacing her building with university housing. She begs them to let her stay, because she is certain that the son who left her 27 years ago will be returning one day-- and wouldn't find her if she moved. It seems very heartwarming, and fit perfectly with my "Growing Old" theme.

"How to Steal a Million" is the movie that got me hooked on classic movies. The fact that I haven't seen it on television since I first saw it seven years ago is just plain awful. It is a fabulous farce about forgery, larceny, art and love. The perfect combination of edge-on-your-seat tension and laugh-out-loud comedy.

"This is My Affair" is one of only a few films pairing Barbara Stanwyck with her husband Robert Taylor. I'm one of those silly people who enjoys watching real-life couples on screen together, and since Stany is my favorite actress I've been dying to watch this for some time.

For Silent Sunday I picked my favorite silent film, "The Conquering Power" simply because it hasn't been played in quite some time, and it is a spectacular piece of cinematography. There is one scene in which walls close in, and gold hands come out of a pile of gold coins that is out- of this world, especially for 1921! Not to mention this is an Alice Terry/Rex Ingram film with Rudolph Valentino. What a combination!

For Monday morning I scheduled a Hal Roach mini-marathon of Thelma Todd shorts: the first three with Patsy Kelly and the following three with ZaSu Pitts. I happened to catch "The Tin Man" a few months ago, and it was so funny I can't wait to see the rest of the shorts that they made as a team! And Hal Roach's shorts are wonderful because they are always fun, yet you can watch them when you have the time. They are great for the busy TCM lover!

I also did a tiny tribute to the greatest butlers ever, before transitioning into a birthday tribute to another great butler: Arthur Treacher. First I highlighted two films with Eric Blore (one of the best character actors, EVER!) and two with Halliwell Hobbes (including the Hobbes live-action short "The Changing of the Guard") then I scheduled three Arthur Treacher films.

For my star of the month I chose Barbara Stanwyck. She is probably the greatest actress ever-- she excels in comedy, drama, melodrama, and even small budget mysteries. She had the ability to make absolutely any material A-quality, which means that when she was given projects like "Meet John Doe" and "The Lady Eve" she made A-quality material EVEN better yet! Everyone who worked with her said she was one of the most professional actresses, and it shows in her work. Few stars can make you forget their star persona and concentrate only on their film character, and Barbara Stanwyck succeeds in this with flying colors. I think it is the least we could do, to honor this great lady of the silver screen, to dedicate the month of July, the month she would turn 100 years old, to her and her wonderful films.

I had fun with my theme for Wednesday night and Thursday morning- Meal Time. Finding the shorts was fun as well, especially "The Wabbit who came to Supper"! Plus this theme gave me the opportunity to schedule a few films that aren't normally shown (He Stayed for Breakfast and Breakfast for Two).

Thursday afternoon I dedicated about six hours to, in my opinion, one of the greatest screenwriters: Robert Riskin. I can't think of anybody else, except maybe Preston Sturges, who could blend so easily humor, political conscience and wit.

Thursday night is dedicated to John and Hayley Mills. When I was a little girl my two favorite actresses were Hayley Mills and Elizabeth Montgomery. The funny thing is that two of my favorite actors are now John Mills and Robert Montgomery! Though this is purely a "for fun" post, I would really appreciate it if TCM would consider getting Hayley Mills as a guest programmer, or for a Private Screening. I'd love to hear her discuss her films, and her fathers films.

Milk Money (1994) and Truffaut

August 21, 2020



Back in 1994, the trailer for Milk Money seemed to be playing on a constant loop on my television. I was seven and the movie is rated PG-13, so it was a while before I ever got around to actually seeing it. But something about the previews always stuck with me and I grew up with a feeling of nostalgia for a movie I had never watched.

I've now seen it a couple times, and during my most recent viewing I was struck with a feeling of familiarity that wasn't nostalgia for the previews I saw as a kid, but something else entirely. It reminded me of Truffaut. Now I know this is going to sound sacrilegious to some, especially since the movie was widely panned and has a whopping 10% score on Rotten Tomatoes. But there is definitely a common thread. I don't know if it was intentional or accidental (I researched to see if Richard Benjamin ever spoke of Truffaut as an influence, but the only mention I could ever find was when Benjamin said he was filming The Last of Sheila at the same studio where Truffaut was filming Day for Night) but either way, if you watch this film as an homage to Truffaut, I think you'll see an entirely different picture and perhaps appreciate it a little more than you would have otherwise. I'm going to break this down into a few themes that are central to Truffaut's work --

1. A coming of age story

Milk Money centers mainly around a young adolescent boy, Frank, and his friends, as they navigate their confusing and exciting entry into adulthood. It's nearly impossible to watch scenes of them cycling together, about to get into mischief, and not see hints of Les Mistons. Their fascination with female anatomy in particular reminded me of the scene in Les Mistons when the kids smell Bernadette's bicycle seat. 

In order to learn more about women, the kids decide to pull their milk money at school and save up to hire a sex worker in the city. I think this might seem a little weird or jarring for a movie made in the '90s, but recall in The 400 Blows, Antoine Doinel recounts his attempt to learn the ways of the world by seeing a sex worker who specializes in young boys (unfortunately for Antoine, she wasn't home the day he called on her.) And in The Man Who Loved Women, a flashback shows Bertrand succeeding where Antoine had failed.

There is a specific combination of childhood sweetness and adult themes that should feel incongruous, but somehow always works in Truffaut's films. And I think it works here, too. So many reviewers marveled at how this seemed to be at once a children's film and an R rated picture, and why didn't the director just make up his mind. But I think that's one of the things that is endearing about Truffaut's movies and it's endearing here, as well. If you think back to how you felt when you were 12 or 13, not entirely sure which world you belonged in and trying desperately to find out everything you could about the secrets of adulthood, it's a lot easier to relate to a movie that has one foot in the cradle and one in a King size bed.

2. Women are magic

It's difficult to think of a movie where Truffaut did not express his belief that women are magic. He was mesmerized by women, idolized them, and thought of them as wonderful enigmas. While this might be an outdated concept now (and might be part of the reason that Milk Money gets a bad rap) it's definitely woven into the fabric of the 1994 movie, too. Frank's father, Tom - played by Ed Harris - is a widow, and all that Frank knows about his mother was that she looked like Grace Kelly. He has put her on a pedestal, idolizing her memory for him and his son. When Tom meets and falls for V, he also sees her as Grace Kelly. She is a princess. Magic.

And the scene in the school where V helps Frank to teach female anatomy to his classmates also harkens back to the fascination with women's legs displayed in The Man Who Loved Woman (and, more broadly, throughout all of Truffaut's oeuvre.) It's a unique and strange combination of reverence and objectification.

3. Random gangster subplot!

Yes, in addition to the coming of age tale and Tom's love story with V, we also have a gangster subplot complete with a classic car chase and a bumbling tough guy. Waltzer's comical proclamations that he doesn't like things ("I don't like closets!") reminded me of Ernest and Momo's small talk after they've kidnapped Charles Aznavour's Charlie in Shoot the Piano Player. 

Is it Richard Benjamin paying tribute to Truffaut paying tribute to the classic American gangster films of the 1930s? It certainly feels like it. Shoot the Piano Player was dragged at the time of its release for being similarly disjointed - is it a comedy? Is it a crime film? A romance? The combination of varying visual styles and genres was met with criticism, but I think the movie is so charming, and it's actually one of my favorite Truffaut films. 

There are some other similarities as well - like when V is enchanted by the calm and safety of suburbia it reminded me of how Antoine Doinel made himself a part of Colette's family in Antoine and Colette, desperate to feel a sense of stability that was lacking in his own life. And the fact that were it not for the '90s clothing and a few pop culture references you could easily believe that Milk Money takes place in 1958. It's imbued with that same sense of timelessness that is a hallmark of most Truffaut films. Even in Jules and Jim, when world events mark a specific place in time, or all of the Antoine Doinel films that have a decidedly '60s or '70s look to them, you can watch the movie and think "when exactly does this take place?"

So am I saying this is as good as a Truffaut film? Not at all. Honestly, not even close. But seen as an homage to the master of the coming of age story, I think it at least deserves a reevaluation. If you can see and appreciate the elements that make a Truffaut movie charming and endearing, perhaps you'll find this movie charming and endearing as well. 

Set photos from Sunday in New York (1963) and Made in Paris (1966)

May 22, 2020



A couple weeks ago I purchased two photos from the set of Sunday in New York on ebay. Thanks to the expertise of my friend & Rod Taylor historian Diane, who runs The Complete Rod Taylor Site, I'm able to share that the cast was celebrating Rod Taylor's marriage in the photo above! He's holding a giant card signed by the cast and crew with a caricature of Rod and wedding bells. Diane also shared with me that the man next to Rod is his friend and stand-in Marco Lopez! In the photo below, you can see Robert Culp and Jane Fonda on the couch, with Rod Taylor's back to the camera.



But our story doesn't end here! After I purchased these Sunday in New York photos, the ebay seller reached out to me to ask if I could help identify actors in some photos that he had in his collection. He e-mailed me four small photos, one of which was a contact sheet. Squinting at my screen I exclaimed, "It can't be!" The contact sheet appeared to contain 12 photos from the set of Made in Paris (1966) starring Chad Everett. What serendipity!! I consulted my fellow Chad Everett enthusiast on twitter, Jackie, to see if she agreed with my assessment and together we pieced together some clues. I have an 8x10 still of Chad Everett in the same outfit, leaning against a Pan Am airplane in a promotional photo for Made in Paris. Jackie realized that the photo number on my still was part of the same sequence used on the contact sheet. I was sold!

I finally opened up the package today and was able to see for the first time, up close, that we were indeed correct! Here are 12 photos from what appears to be a deleted scene from Made in Paris, with Richard Crenna!

As always, you can click on all of these photos to see them larger :)

























Original transparencies from Sunday in New York (1963)

May 07, 2020



I recently acquired two original transparencies from Sunday in New York (1963) and I'm so excited to share them with you! I photographed them on my lightbox and then imported them into Photoshop to adjust the tones and clean up a few dust and scratch marks. I think my favorite thing about these photos is how you can see the tape on the floor for Robert Culp's mark in the first photo!

If you click on the pictures you can view and download larger versions of the images.



Chad Everett original snapshots

April 24, 2020



I had the good fortune to win an ebay auction recently for four original snapshots of Chad Everett! The seller didn't provide any information about where the photographs came from, but I'm wondering if they belonged to someone who knew him since the photo with Connie Stevens is inscribed on the back simply "Chad and Connie S."

There was some definite reddening of the tones, and some dust and spots that I retouched in photoshop. The first photo below is my absolute favorite. I'm crossing the line here that separates collector from fangirl, but... that hair curl!

You can click on the photos to see and download larger versions.









If anyone has any information about the photos please let me know! I'd love to know when the photo with Connie Stevens was taken. I know that they worked together on five episodes of Hawaiian Eye in the early 1960s, so I'm curious if the studio paired them up for an event to try to raise his star a bit. 

While researching I found this page from the 2011 Hollywood Media Professionals luncheon that honored Chad Everett. If you scroll down you can see a few photos of him reunited with Connie Stevens just a little over a year before he passed away in July of 2012.

My picks for the Special Home Edition of the TCM Film Festival

April 14, 2020



Since the TCM Film Festival was cancelled, the network has launched a Special Home Edition of the festival instead! They'll be showing events and films from festivals past, as well as a few new treats that had been intended for this year's fest. Normally I have a hard time choosing which movie to pick when 5 great films are all scheduled at the same time, but this year my only struggle is deciding which movies to record on my limited DVR space, lol!

I will definitely be utilizing my DVR for films that are playing while I'm sleeping or working, but I definitely recommend trying to watch the films live if you can. Not only has TCM promised exclusive content and special guests, but watching something live while you're logged into your favorite social media app can help make the festival feel even more real. The collective laughter and the feeling of a shared experience at the movies can still be accessed remotely through the wonder of the internet :)

Without further ado, here are my picks:

4/16 at 8PM EST - A Star is Born (1954) I actually just watched this for the very first time last week, and I really enjoyed it! I had only seen the 1937 version and I'd always been so sure that nobody could ever rival the performances of Janet Gaynor and Fredric March so it wasn't even worth giving the other adaptations the time of day. But Judy Garland and James Mason were outstanding. There was one scene where Judy Garland was talking through a kind of dry-heave cry that was so heartwrenching I found myself suddenly situated in the "why didn't she get an Oscar for this?!" camp. I still prefer the original, but I enjoyed this so much that I'm already looking forward to revisiting it again this Friday.

4/16 at 1:45AM EST - Luise Rainer: Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival (2011) I adore Luise Rainer and I'm so sad that her appearance at the festival came 3 years before I was able to attend in person. My only concern in watching this is that I'm afraid she'll mention her distaste for my personal favorite of her films, Dramatic School. It's the loveliest film about a girl who gets lost in her daydreams and even though I've read that she wasn't fond of the movie it's been a favorite ever since I first saw it in high school. I have a habit of really loving movies that the stars didn't like (another one that comes to mind is The Notorious Landlady, a film that I love but Jack Lemmon did not.)

4/17 at 8:30AM - She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949) I'm trying to be more open minded about westerns now, ever since I watched a few with Chad Everett last year and realized they're actually very enjoyable! And since those were sort of B-tier westerns (one was never even released into theaters) I'd imagine that I'll really like a Grade A film like She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. Besides, I just need to fix the fact that Donovan's Reef is my current favorite teaming of John Ford and John Wayne. That's not acceptable, right? lol

4/17 at 12:30PM - A Hard Day's Night (1964) This was one of my all time favorite experiences at the TCM Film Festival. Me and Nicole had tried to get into a pre-code on standby and didn't make it, so we decided to get in line for this on a whim instead. Two hours later we were full fledged Beatles fangirls! I cannot wait to revisit this and relive all of those fun memories!



4/17 at 3:15PM - North by Northwest (1959) This is one of those movies that I end up watching pretty much every time it airs on TCM, so whether it was part of the festival or just showing on a random Saturday, I'd probably have it on. It's my brother's favorite Hitchcock movie so my family has enjoyed this one countless times over the years and watching it always takes me to that warm cozy fuzzy family memory place. We could all use that right about now, right?

4/17 at 8PM - Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story (2015) I watched this on the recommendation of my friend Raquel from Out of the Past and it's one of those movies that not only lived up to, but exceeded my expectations. It is one of the sweetest documentaries I've ever seen in my life, and as an illustrator I couldn't help but feel in awe of, and inspired by, Harold's storyboard art. Raquel will be live-tweeting this while it airs so be sure to pop over to twitter and follow along with her!

4/17 at 3:15AM - Night Flight (1933) I have six words for you: Robert. Montgomery. movie. I've. never. seen. That's all I need to say, right?

4/18 at 6AM - The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) I can't pass up Frank Sinatra's greatest performance! Ever since I was 13 it's been one of my life's missions to preach the gospel of Frank Sinatra's acting talent and there is no better display than this film (except maybe From Here to Eternity. And The Joker is Wild. And Kings Go Forth. And. and. and.) His portrayal of a man trying to battle addiction while tied down to an overbearing and deceitful wife is staggering! It's also a lot to take in at 6am so I'll probably be DVRing this one and watching it later in the day with some chocolate to help get me through.

4/19 at 9AM - Peter O'Toole, Live from the TCM Classic Film Festival (2012) This event occurred two years before I was able to attend in person, although meeting Peter O'Toole's wax figure at the wax museum on Hollywood Boulevard was definitely one of the highlights of my 2014 trip!



Peter O'Toole was such a fascinating man - one of those actors whose offscreen life was just as interesting and lively as their onscreen life, someone who had a quick wit and a sharp tongue. I cannot wait to hear all the stories he had to tell Robert Osborne in 2012!

4/19 at 8PM - Floyd Norman: An Animated Life (2016) Floyd Norman was one of the announced guests for the 2020 Festival, and I was really looking forward to hearing him speak and seeing one of the films he worked on, The Sword in the Stone. I love that TCM still found a way to honor him during the Home Edition of the festival! Animation is often a tedious, thankless art form and I love that TCM has been honoring the artists behind the animated films we all love so much!

4/19 at 1:45AM - Baby Face (1933) Is there any better way to round out the festival than with pre-code Barbara Stanwyck sleeping her way up the corporate ladder? I think not! I have seen Baby Face more times than I can count, but I am super excited about watching it again and experiencing it as part of this stay at home festival.

Two films that I would normally LOVE but have decided to skip out on this year are The Seventh Seal and Jezebel. I love me some Ingmar Bergman and Bette Davis but I'm not in a plaguey mood at the moment. I know, that's normally right up my alley, but I just can't. If you're tolerating the outbreak situation better than I am, though, I highly recommend both films. The Seventh Seal is phenomenal and I really wish I was in the mood to watch it. I may tune in before it starts to see if they include the interview with Max Von Sydow, though. It'll be showing at 6:45AM on 4/17 if you'd like to watch!

And that about wraps up my picks and recommendations! One thing that's actually cool about the festival this year is that all the people who never got to go in person get to participate this time around. I always have very intense FOMO on the years that I stay home, so it's nice that we all get to experience it together this year :)